Monthly Archives: April 2013

Borderlands History at the 2013 National Council on Public History Annual Meeting

From April 17 to April 20th the NCPH held its annual meeting. Four borderlands history PhD students at UT El Paso traveled to Ottowa this year to participate. Here is a brief summary of the panel, entitled:

The Contestation, Appropriation, and Production of Historical Memory in the Borderlands

Abstract

By using a fairly loose geographical and metaphorical definition of Borderlands—anything from California to Louisiana, Texas and the Caribbean, or from Baja California to Tamaulipas and Nuevo León, the panelists will explore the ways in which groups and/or individuals have presented their particular visions of history in language, public venues and media, including museums, monuments, festivals, reenactments, historic preservation, architecture, and promotion of tourism.

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Newberry Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies CFP Reminder

I apologize for re-posting, but think this is worth publicizing a bit more.  I presented in this seminar series back in 2012 and have a very positive experience.  Great people, great feedback on my work.  You still have 2 days to submit a proposal.  Send something in!

Call for Proposals and Instructions HERE:

Due April 25th

The Newberry Library Seminar in BORDERLANDS AND LATINO STUDIES

Co-sponsored by Indiana University’s Latino Studies Program, Northwestern University’s Program in Latina and Latino Studies, the
Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s History Department, the Center
for Latino Research at DePaul University, and the Katz Center for Mexican Studies at the University of Chicago

This seminar provides a forum for works-in-progress that explore topics in Borderlands and Latino studies. We seek proposals for seminar papers that examine the interplay of Latino people, communities, and culture in the United States; transnational and comparative “borderlands” studies; civil rights and social movements; and other related topics. We welcome proposals from scholars working in a broad range of academic fields, and are particularly interested in interdisciplinary approaches.

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Review of: Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries

Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries

Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández, Duke University Press 2011

In Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries, Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández forcefully argues, “…violence forms the foundations of national histories and subjectivity….”  To demonstrate this, she examines four historical flashpoints: the 1851 lynching of a Mexican woman in a California mining town, the Camp Grant Indian Massacre of 1871, the erasures of racialized and sexualized violence in South Texas in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the Yaqui Indian wars of 1880-1910. In the five chapters of the book (two are dedicated to the Yaquis) Guidotti-Hernández takes each of these historical flashpoints and interrogates them, showing first how they have been minimalized and erased from national histories. She then offers new analyses of these somewhat familiar incidents, illuminating how violence creates the nation-state – both Mexican and U.S. – in the context of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century U.S.-Mexico borderlands.

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Categories: Book and Journal Reviews | 1 Comment

The Newberry Library Seminar in Borderlands and Latino Studies, 2013-14 CFP

The Newberry Library Seminar in BORDERLANDS AND LATINO STUDIES

Co-sponsored by Indiana University’s Latino Studies Program, Northwestern University’s Program in Latina and Latino Studies, the
Institute for Latino Studies at the University of Notre Dame, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s History Department, the Center
for Latino Research at DePaul University, and the Katz Center for Mexican Studies at the University of Chicago

This seminar provides a forum for works-in-progress that explore topics in Borderlands and Latino studies. We seek proposals for seminar papers that examine the interplay of Latino people, communities, and culture in the United States; transnational and comparative “borderlands” studies; civil rights and social movements; and other related topics. We welcome proposals from scholars working in a broad range of academic fields, and are particularly interested in interdisciplinary approaches.

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Categories: Calls for Papers | Leave a comment

Gunfire and a Manhunt in my Supposedly Quiet Bordered-Backyard

In December, I wrote about my experience growing up on “The Other Border.”  I explained how the proximity of a seemingly porous and un-militarized U.S.-Canadian border (much of it rural or remote mountain wilderness) violated some of our popular conceptions of what U.S. borders are like.  Of course, I have always known that plenty of illicit things go on along my quaint Whatcom County border with British Columbia, but this headline in the Bellingham Herald really caught my eye.

Gunfire near Sumas border sparks manhunt

“Sumas?” I thought.  “That tiny little border crossing in my county’s backyard?”  Indeed, it was that very Sumas.  I followed the story throughout the day yesterday.   It even got picked up by national news outlets like the L.A. Times and USA Today.  Naturally, the Canadian Press picked up on the story too, offering some great helicopter footage of the area.

Two men were eventually apprehended and 58.2 lbs of Amphetamine were recovered.

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Categories: Uncategorized | 2 Comments

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