Monthly Archives: October 2016

CFP: American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Annual Meeting in Austin, TX, September 6-9, 2017

Annual Meeting 2017 Theme: I AM History

The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) will present its 2017 Annual Meeting in Austin, TX from September 6-9.

I’m part of the conference committee and will be part of the group reviewing proposals. Feel free to get in touch with me if you need presentation and/or panel ideas: http://about.aaslh.org/am-call-for-proposals/

i-am-historyProposals are submitted online and are due December 9. Contact Bethany Hawkins with any questions at hawkins@aaslh.org or 615-320-3203.

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Honoring the Legacy of Dr. Mario T. Garcia, October 26, 2016

The UTEP Department of History hosted “Honoring the Legacy of Dr. Mario T. Garcia: A Graduate Student Roundtable Discussion of Chicana/o Movement History,” as part of the University’s 2016 Distinguished Alumni, on Wednesday, October 26, 2016, at the Rubin Center Auditorium on the University campus.

According to the UTEP History Department, Dr. Mario T. Garcia received his BA and MA from the Department of History at UTEP in 1966 and 1968 respectively. He then went on to complete his Ph.D. at the University of California at San Diego.  He is the author of several influential books, including Desert Immigrants: The Mexicans of El Paso, 1880-1920, which focuses on the history of El Paso between 1880 and 1920; as well as The Chicano Movement: Perspectives from the Twenty-First Century; The Latino Generation: Voices of the New America; and Blowout! Sal Castro and the Chicano Struggle for Educational Justice. He has published approximately twenty titles in all.  Dr. Garcia has received numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is currently a distinguished professor of History and Chicano studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he has been a faculty member for 41 years. The roundtable included student discussions of their research in Chicana/o history, followed by comments from Dr. Mario T. Garcia about his life’s work.  In his presentation, Dr. Garcia spoke about his development as a historian and his challenges and opportunities in writing Chicana/o history.

Dr. Jeffrey Shepherd, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, opened the session and Dr. Ernesto Chavez, Associate Professor (far right) introduced Dr. Garcia.  Student panelists included (from right to left): Dennis Aguirre, Doctoral Candidate; Melanie Rodriguez, Doctoral Candidate; Angelina Martinez, Doctoral student; Blanca Garcia, Doctoral student; and David Robles, Doctoral Candidate.

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Notes on the 2016 UHA Annual Meeting at Chicago

Greetings from Chicago, Illinois!  From the 13 to the 16 of October, 2016, urban historians, city planners, biographers, architects, and public policy specialists convened at the Philip Corboy Law Center of Loyola University Chicago for the Urban History Association’s Eighth Biennial Conference.  David-James (DJ) Gonzales and I had the opportunity to attend and present at this year’s meeting.

We arrived on Friday, October 14 and were able to visit some amazing panels that interrogated the themes of carcerality and the state, urban history before the “city,” settler colonialism, and the lack of scholarship on urban Latinx history.  It is exciting to see over the years how each urban history conference features more and more panels on Latinx neighborhoods, community activism, and radical political thought.  Some of the panels that were scheduled for the weekend included: “The Fight for Immigrant Rights in Los Angeles, Post-1965,” “Latino Studies and the New Urban History,” “Urban Latinos: Ethnic Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Transnational Communities, and Cities in the Postwar United States,” “Latinos and the Changing World of Urban Work,” and “Rethinking the Boston ‘Bussing Crisis’”

Moreover, there were some great sessions on the connections between ethnicity, immigration, and urban space, as with a plenary on “A City of Immigrants: Immigration Reform since 1965 and its Urban Consequences.”  The panel sought to present post-1965 as a defining point not just for civil rights, but for new groups of Latinx immigrants to the country.  There was also a roundtable titled, “Settler Colonialism in American History?”  This panel was absolutely terrific, especially because of the open conversations the panelists had with the audience.  An individual from the audience posed the question, “Can only native scholars utilize settler colonialism in their research and can settler colonialism only be used to understand native pasts?”  Nathan Connolly, a Black historian of property rights and land in Florida, responded that the moment we start to put restrictions on who can write certain pasts or operate specific optics is the moment white supremacy succeeds.  Llana Barber, a specialist in immigration and Latinx history, concurred and suggested that settler colonialism helps attenuate the differences between different historically-marginalized ethnic groups.  She compared Puerto Rican and Native American pasts, referring to land sovereignty and citizenship rights through the guise of a friendly state.  The roundtable concluded that settler colonialism can and is helpful in thinking through ethnic histories like the Latinx past. Continue reading

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New Borderlands History Article: Heather M. Sinclair, “White Plague, Mexican Menace: Migration, Race,Class and Gendered Contagion in El Paso, Texas, 1880-1930”

Abstract:
This article examines a debate that emerged in El Paso, Texas at the turn of the twentieth century surrounding the transmission of pulmonary tuberculosis from predominantly Anglo American migrants to the city’s ethnic Mexican population. Reports of Anglo-to-Mexican infections came from cities and towns throughout the U.S. Southwest, but by 1915 El Paso had emerged as the epicenter of the debate. Using popular and professional sources, the article tracks a shift in dominant perceptions of tubercular contagion from an association with white bodies to Mexican ones. An early narrative casts the Mexican female domestic servant as a victim of the infectious indigent white consumptive male health seeker. In 1915, as the Mexican Revolution raged and tensions between whites and ethnic Mexicans in the city sharpened, federal public health authorities published a report dismissing health seekers as a source of contagion to ethnic Mexicans. This article highlights the power of notions of race, gender, and class in shaping perceptions of and responses to epidemics, often with tragic results.

About the author:
In May 2016, Heather M. Sinclair received her doctorate from the University of Texas at El Paso in Borderlands History. Her dissertation, “Birth City: Race and Violence in the History of Childbirth and Midwifery in the El Paso-Ciudad Juárez Borderlands, 1907-2013,” centers of the history of women’s racialized reproduction in the borderlands. While completing this original study, Sinclair was simultaneously writing an article about disease, race, and gender in El Paso, published in the November issue of the Pacific Historical Review.

Link to the article here:
http://phr.ucpress.edu/content/85/4/475

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Job Alert: UConn Latina/o Studies, Tenure-Track

Dear readers, the Department of History and the Institute of Latina/o, Caribbean and Latin American Studies is conducting a search to fill a tenure-track position. They are especially looking for candidates who can teach “Puerto Rican history, Latin American/Caribbean history before 1900, U.S. Latina/o History, Gender/Sexuality history, Legal history, and Brazilian history.” Also, the preferred date for submissions is fast approaching, October 28. From the posting:

…the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Connecticut, invite applications for a tenure-track assistant professor in Latin American, Caribbean and/or U.S. Latina/o History, for any chronological specialization. The candidate will be jointly appointed with El Instituto; the tenure home will be in History. The successful candidate will be expected to teach survey courses in one or more of these fields, together with more advanced courses in the candidate’s area of interest. This person will be expected to develop a strong, ongoing research trajectory through high quality publications.  As jointly appointed faculty, teaching and service will be equally divided between History and El Instituto…

The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to research and, high quality publications, and national recognition as through honorific awards. In the area of teaching, the successful candidate will share a commitment to effective instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels, development of innovative courses and mentoring of students in research, outreach and professional development. Successful candidates will also be expected to broaden participation among members of under-represented groups; demonstrate through their research, teaching, and/or public engagement the richness of diversity in the learning experience; integrate multicultural experiences into instructional methods and research tools; and provide leadership in developing pedagogical techniques designed to meet the needs of diverse learning styles and intellectual interests.

For more information, or to apply, follow the link.

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New Book: Globalizing Borderlands Studies

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Globalizing Borderlands Studies in Europe and North America is a new edited volume that bring together scholarship on Europe, North Africa, the Baltics, Mexico, and the United States to examine “the importance of economic, political, social, and religious interactions.” University of Nebraska Press, which publishes the new work, reached out to us recently to let us know the book is now out. It’s co-edited by John W.I. Lee at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who has studied the borderlands of antiquity in the Mediterranean world. He’s joined by Michael North, an economic historian from the University of Greifswald (Germany), who specializes in the financial and monetary history of Europe and the Baltics. From the book description:

Gathering the voices of a diverse range of international scholars, Globalizing Borderlands Studies in Europe and North America presents case studies from ancient to modern times, highlighting topics ranging from religious conflicts to medical frontiers to petty trade… [this book] not only forges links between past and present scholarship but also paves the way for new models and approaches in future borderlands research.

In the coming months, we hope to follow up with a book review. For more information, follow the link to the UNP page.

Full disclosure: my book, Building a Revolutionary State through Roads: Mexico, 1917-1952, is under contract with University of Nebraska Press, publication forthcoming.

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Double Job Alert: Chicanx/Latinx Studies, tenure-track openings

Dear readers, we wanted to let you know about to tenure-track opportunities in Chicanx/Latinx Studies with application deadlines quickly approaching. The first is at California State University Channel Island, where the Chicana/o Studies program is seeking to hire a new assistant professor. From the job description:

Special consideration will be given to candidates whose research and teaching focuses on (in)justice issues, broadly defined, that may include the criminal justice system, prison industrial complex, law and socio-economic inequality; we are also interested in candidates whose interdisciplinary work focuses on discourse analysis and visual critique that blends theory and practice, film, multi-media, art, music, critical race, gender, and queer studies.

The successful candidate must have earned a PhD in Chicana/o Studies or an equivalent field by time of appointment, moreover, while preference is given to current PhD holder, ABDs will also be considered. The deadline to apply is November 1st. For more information, follow the link.

Today’s second job alert comes from the other side of the country at Kennesaw State University in northern Georgia. The Interdisciplinary Studies Department is looking for candidates to fill a 9-month tenure track position in Latinx or American Studies. The successful candidate will join the department at the rank of assistant professor with a 3/3 course load. ABDs will also be considered in the application process. From the description:

The professor will teach undergraduate courses for the Latin American/Latin@ Studies program and undergraduate and graduate courses in the American Studies program. Possible courses might include Introduction to Latin American/Latin@ Studies; Introduction to American Studies at the undergraduate and graduate levels; Popular Culture of the Americas; and other courses in the candidate’s area of specialization.

For more information, or to apply, follow the link. The deadline to submit an application is October 24th.

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A Conversation with Kelly Lytle Hernandez and John Mckiernan-González: recent approaches to the scholarship of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Scholarship on the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands composes a significant and influential genre within the field of U.S. Western History and Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies. Geographically rooted in the U.S. Southwest and Mexico, or Greater Mexico, publications in this subfield explore a broad range of themes including: migration and labor, citizenship and race, culture and identity formation, gender and sexuality, politics and social justice, just to name a few.

This conversation features two prominent historians of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Kelly Lytle Hernandez, author of Migra!: A History of the U.S. Border Patrol (UC Press, 2010), and John Mckiernan-González, author of Fevered Measures: Public Health and Race at the Texas-Mexico Border, 1848-1942 (Duke University Press, 2012). My discussion with Kelly and John focuses on their exemplary scholarship to explore how historians conceptualize, investigate, and explain the history of the U.S.-Mexico Border region. In particular, we discuss how the U.S.-Mexico border exists in the minds of policy makers, bureaucrats, low level officials, businessmen and the public at large, as more than a fixed political boundary. Indeed, competing notions of who and what the border is supposed to control has historically shaped ideas about race, public policy, and law enforcement practices throughout the U.S.-Mexico border region. In addition to their existing work, we discuss their forthcoming publications which signal exciting new directions in the field of Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies and U.S. History in general.

This conversation was recorded during a session of the 109th annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association held earlier this month in Kona, Hawaii.

Listen to this conversation in its entirety by clicking HERE

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