Author Archives: Jared T.

Thoughts on The Bridge and the Borderlands

On July 10, FX premiered its new crime drama, The Bridge, which takes place in the Juarez/El Paso region. Three of our bloggers offer their thoughts on the inaugural episode.  What were your thoughts on the premier?

Tim Bowman

Juárez is a city that many Americans seem to have a real problem with.  In some respects this problem is well earned. Some Americans are probably unaware that the drug cartels were already a major problem even before the uptick in violence that occurred after Felipe Calderón’s election in 2006.  Others have undoubtedly missed the brutal rash of femicides committed against young factory workers since the 1990s. Finally, the Juárez with which many concerned American liberals are familiar is that of a big city and its maquiladoras, which at this point need no introduction. Continue reading

Categories: Book and Journal Reviews | 3 Comments

Editorial: Immigration Bills Are Not Reform by Miguel Levario

Borderlands History blog is pleased to host this editorial on the immigration legislation currently being debated in congress, written by historian Miguel Levario, author of Militarizing the Border: When Mexicans Became the Enemy (Texas A&M University Press, 2012). 

As the debate rages on in both the Senate and the House of Representatives regarding immigration policy, we must be clear that the proposals are not about reform. Both the Senate and House versions do NOT improve our immigration infrastructure but rather expand it.  Everything from legalizing the status of millions of undocumented residents to militarizing the border is not a shift or improvement in American policy.

First, let me begin with one of the most glaring problems with the latest Senate version of the immigration bill, which is the collapsing of immigration and border security into one singular entity.  Immigration and border security are inherently contradictory.  Immigration suggests openness and movement while border militarization and security suggests closure and resistance to outside influences.  More specifically, according to the proposal, a path to citizenship for millions of undocumented residents would not be fully realized until the border is 100% secure.   Continue reading

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Luis Alberto Urrea, “Universal Border: From Tijuana to the World” 7:30 p.m. March 6 at New Mexico State University

“Luis Alberto Urrea, an award-winning author, will present “Universal Border: From Tijuana to the World” at 7:30 p.m. March 6 at New Mexico State University’s Atkinson Recital Hall. The event is free and open to the public as part of NMSU’s University Speaker Series.”

See this article for more information.

 

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The Mexican American Archival Enterprise at the Benson Latin American Collection: An Historical Appraisal, April 18-19, 2013

The Mexican American Archival Enterprise at the Benson Latin American Collection: An Historical Appraisal

Free and Open to the General Public
Evening Reception Followed by One-Day Symposium
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Borderlands History Blog Turns 1

On January 26, 2012, Borderlands History Blog went live. We look forward to more and better content in this next year. Thank you for reading and for your support. If you have news, announcements, or might be interested in guest blogging with us, please drop us an email at borderlandshistory@gmail.com.  Though our focus is on North American borderlands history, we’d love to present more from other geographic and methodological perspectives, so if you have some ideas, please drop us a line.

Please follow us on twitter, @BorderlandsHistLike us on Facebook, and don’t fail to share links to our posts via the Twitter and Facebook buttons below each post.

Here are some highlights from our first year. If you missed commenting on one of these the first time around, please feel free to leave a comment and restart the conversation!  Continue reading

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The Newberry Library Borderlands and Latino Studies Seminar, February 15, 2013: Lee Bebout and John McKiernan-Gonzalez

Lee Bebout, Arizona State University and John McKiernan-Gonzalez, University of Texas at Austin

Borderlands and Latino Studies Seminar
Friday, February 15, 2013 Continue reading
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CFP: Religion on the Move: Movement, Migration, Missions and New Media across Religious Traditions, April 26, 2013

Religion on the Move: Movement, Migration, Missions and New Media across Religious Traditions

Columbia University, Department of Religion

Annual Graduate Student Conference
Friday April 26, 2013 Continue reading

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Job Listing: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, History Department, University of Texas at El Paso

Position Description
The University of Texas at El Paso seeks to fill a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in the history of the region that is now the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. The successful candidate will play a key role in the PhD program in Borderlands history–a program that transcends traditional historiographical boundaries. She or he will teach graduate and undergraduate courses on the Borderlands and colonial Mexico. The ability to teach broader courses on colonial Latin America is also desirable. The teaching load is competitive for a research-intensive department. Continue reading

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The 1912 Mormon Exodus from Mexico–Book & Documentary Lectures in New Mexico and El Paso, November 9 & 10, 2012

Fred Woods, professor of religion at Brigham Young University is set to publish a book based on his research into the 1912 flight of Mormons from their northern Mexican colonies. Continue reading

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2 Borderlands History-Related Job Postings, Assistant and Associate Professor of History at UT Austin

Thank you Miguel Juarez for passing this on:
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