Author Archives: Kendra Moore

About Kendra Moore

I am currently an instructor at Northern Arizona University trained in the fields of U.S./Mexico Borderlands History, Women's/Gender History, Race/Ethnic History, and Feminist Criminology. I am passionate about teaching, my research on the law, punishment, female criminal behavior in the 19th century U.S./Mexico Borderlands, humanitarian aid work, and continuing to grow personally and professionally. I am also an active blogger for the Borderlands History Blog and a member of numerous history professional organizations and committees.

Call for Book/Article Titles for Borderlands History Blog Historiography

Calling all BHB followers: As the 2015 school year begins, we here at the Blog are looking to update the page’s historiography sections and we need your help. What 2013/2014 texts and articles do you feel should be included on our page? As always, we welcome interdisciplinary and comparative borderlands submissions. Submit your favorite/relevant works on Facebook, Twitter, or at Kendra.Moore@nau.edu and we will add them to the Blog. If you have posted before you can just add them to the pertinent sections. Happy New Year!

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Call for Borderlands History Syllabi

Borderlands History

Hello Borderlands History Blog followers. As the the 2014/2015 academic year begins to pass us by, we at  the Borderlands History Blog have decided to create an interdisciplinary syllabus repository for courses on the U.S./Mexico, North American, and Global borderlands. Our ultimate goal is to establish a space where academics and teachers of all levels can access the latest information on the reading and visual materials, sources, methods, and assessments their colleagues use to aid students’ understanding of these diverse regions. Along with submissions from the field of History, we also encourage those from areas such as Anthropology, Comparative Borderlands Studies, English, Ethnic Studies,Indigenous Studies, Latino/a Studies, Sociology, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Syllabi from fields not mentioned above are also encouraged! Please send your submissions as PDF attachments to Dr. Kendra Moore at Kendra.Moore@nau.edu and have an excellent school year.

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JOB ANNOUNCEMENT: TT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN LATINO STUDIES OR MIGRATION, UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

The American Studies Department at the University of Kansas is seeking candidates for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Latino Studies and/or Migration Studies expected to begin as early as August 18, 2015.Candidates should possess a strong emphasis on migration, with a specific focus on Latina/o Studies. Secondary areas of specialization are open and may include: gender, the family, and migration; comparative and historical migration; diasporas; human trafficking; migration in the Americas; public policy and law; and the ethical and moral dimensions of migration. Candidates will be expected to teach core courses in American Studies and in the Latino Studies minor and to contribute to the broader university research environment, including university initiatives in migration and trafficking in the context of the global economy.

For more information or to submit an application, please see the following website:

https://employment.ku.edu/academic/1917BR

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Call for Borderlands History Syllabi

Hello Borderlands History Blog followers. As the the 2014/2015 academic year begins to pass us by, we at  the Borderlands History Blog have decided to create an interdisciplinary syllabus repository for courses on the U.S./Mexico, North American, and Global borderlands. Our ultimate goal is to establish a space where academics and teachers of all levels can access the latest information on the reading and visual materials, sources, methods, and assessments their colleagues use to aid students’ understanding of these diverse regions. Along with submissions from the field of History, we also encourage those from areas such as Anthropology, Comparative Borderlands Studies, English, Ethnic Studies,Indigenous Studies, Latino/a Studies, Sociology, and Women’s and Gender Studies. Syllabi from fields not mentioned above are also encouraged! Please send your submissions as PDF attachments to Dr. Kendra Moore at Kendra.Moore@nau.edu and have an excellent school year.

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CFP’s: 2014 Western History Conference in Newport Beach

Listed below is the CFP’s for the 2014 Western History Conference in Newport Beach, California. Next year’s theme is The West and the World, and proposals drawing on comparative borderlands and comparative indigenous scholarship are especially encouraged. In addition to the formal call, Dr. Jeffery Shepherd is organizing graduate student panels on topics such as settler colonialism / native peoples,  gender / sexuality,  borderlands,  Chicano movement, and public health/medicalization. Interested graduate students should contact Dr. Shepherd directly at jpsheperd@utep.edu with a brief description of their work. The deadline is rapidly approaching, so papers and panel submissions should be made within the next few weeks.

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The Undocumented: A New Independent Film on PBS

As both a college professor and a humanitarian aid worker, I am always searching for new films on immigration for my classroom. On April 29, 2013, the PBS series [I]NDEPENDENT LENS aired the documentary The Undocumented  by filmmaker Marco Williams. The latest in a series of productions addressing the influx of border crossings in Arizona’s Sonora Desert, the film is, on the surface, the story of Marcos Hernandez, an undocumented immigrant living in Chicago and searching for his father Francisco, who was abandoned in the desert in 1998 while crossing to find work in the United States. Viewers follow Marcos eleven years later as he desperately reaches out to organizations such as Derechos Humanos, the Mexican Consulate, and the Pima County Medical Examiner in order to find his father and bring him home.

The Undocumented is more than the story of Marcos Hernandez’ s search, however. It is the story of the hundreds of desconocido(a)s discovered  in the Arizona desert each year unable to speak for themselves and of the men and women who work tirelessly to help them regain their identity. Continue reading

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